Note-Taking

Note-Taking is a practice of noting down the information and the facts that you heard from a source normally oral discussion and a lecture. This will help you go through the same after some time and recollect what was discussed and what was said.

Make notes of the following passage.

Helen Keller, when she was an 18 months old child was stricken with a disease that robbed her of the ability to see and hear, but against overwhelming odds, she waged a slow and steady but successful battle to re-enter the world of the normal people. The child grew into a highly intelligent and sensitive woman who wrote, spoke and laboured incessantly for the cause of the world in general and the physically- challenged in particular.

Helen was born in Tuscumbia, Alabama, the USA on June 27, 1880. When she was about six years old her parents appealed to Alexander Graham Bell - an authority on teaching speech to the deaf and dumb - for counsel regarding her education. As a result, Anne Mansfield Sullivan, trained in teaching such children, came to stay with Helen as her teacher. Sullivan, then 20 years old, who was blind once but who had partially regained her vision was a graduate of the Perkins School for the Blind at Boston. Both of them took to each other instantaneously and remained inseparable till Anne's death.



Note-Taking :

Helen Keller was 18 months old when she was stricken with a disease. She waged a slow and steady but successful battle. The child grew into a highly intelligent woman. Helen was born in Tuscumbia, Alexander Graham Bell was an authority on teaching speech to the deaf and dumb. Anne Mansfield Sullivan was teaching such children. Helen and Anne remained inseparable.

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