Adverbial Phrase




Adverbial Phrase :


A
preposition is a word placed before a substantive to show its relation to some other word in the sentence.

The substantive which follows a preposition is called its
object and is in the objective case .

A phrase consisting of a preposition and its object, with or without other words, is called a prepositional phrase.

1. On the floor lay a heap of nuts.
2. He stood behind the tree for some time.
3. From morning till night he remained at his post.
4. The fire destroyed everything except a few articles of furniture.

A prepositional phrase may be either adjective or adverbial.

Thus, in the first example,
of nuts is an adjective phrase modifying the noun heap and on the floor is an adverbial phrase modifying the verb lay. In the second sentence, the verb stood is modified by two adverbial phrases, behind the tree and for some time.

The following list includes most of the prepositions.

aboard
about
above
according to
across
after
against
along
along with
amid
amidst
among
amongst
apart from
around
as for
as to
at
athwart
barring
because of
before
behind
below
beneath
beside
besides
between
betwixt
beyond
but (= except)
by
by dint of
by means of
by reason of
by virtue of
by way of
concerning
considering
despite
down
during
ere
except
excepting
for
for the sake of
from
from among
from between
from under
in
in accordance with
in addition to
in case of
in compliance with
in consequence of
in consideration of
in front of
in lieu of
in opposition to
in place of
in preference to
in regard to
in spite of
inside (inside of)
instead of
into
notwithstanding
of
off
on
on account of
out of
outside (outside of)
over
over against
past
pending
regarding
respecting
round
round about
save
saving
since
through
throughout
to
unto
touching
toward
towards
under
underneath
until
till
up
upon
with
within
without
with reference to
with regard to
with respect to

Note : Such expressions as by means of, in accordance with, in spite of, etc., are really phrases, but may be regarded as compound prepositions .

Several participles like concerning, considering, pending, are common in a prepositional use and are therefore included in the list.

……a (a form of on) in abed, asleep, afire, a-fishing.

PER is confined to the strictly commercial style except in such expressions as perforce, per cent, per annum.

A preposition may stand at the end of a sentence or clause.

Whom did you ask for? [Compare: For whom did you ask?]

The box which it came in has been destroyed. [Compare: The box in which it came.]

Note : This order, though informal, is common in the best authors; but, if carelessly used, it may result in awkwardness of style. Sometimes a relative which is the object of the preposition is omitted. Thus, in the second sentence, which might be dropped, and the object of in would then be “which, understood." For HE WAS LAUGHED AT and the like.


In poetry a preposition sometimes follows its object directly such as - Barefoot plod I the cold ground upon (Shakespeare).


Certain adverbial expressions like “on Sunday," “on March first," occur both with and without the preposition.

1. He came Sunday (or, on Sunday).
2. We sail March first (or, on March first).

Note : The forms without on are good colloquial English, but are avoided in the more formal style. No preposition need be supplied in parsing. The noun is an adverbial objective (§ 109).

Care is required in the use of pronouns as
the objects of prepositions .

1. {He has been very friendly | The old house will seem lonely | That makes no difference} to you and me. [Not: you and I.]

2. {Tom’s carelessness makes trouble | There are letters at the post office} for you and me.

3. I have invitations for {you and him. | you and her.}

4. He will divide the reward between you and me.

5. {Whom are you waiting for? | Whom were you speaking to?} [Not : who.]

Several words are used either as adverbs or prepositions.

As Adverb…….As Preposition

I fell down…….I fell down the steps.

Stand by!.......He stood by the window.

A big dog ran behind. ……..A dog ran behind the carriage.

Keep off!........ Keep off the grass.

Other examples are aboard, above, after, along, before, below, beneath, beside, between, beyond, ere, in, inside, on, outside, past, round, since, under, up, within, without.

Prepositions show various distinctions in use and meaning which must be learned by practice and by the study of synonyms in a large dictionary.

The following groups afford opportunity for such study…….

at, in

in, into

between, among, amid

on, upon

from, off

round, around, about

to, with

beside, besides

agree with, agree to

change for, change with

disappoint in, of

differ with, from

confide in, to

correspond with, to

part from, with

compare to, with

join with, to

connect with, to

come up with, to

talk to, with

speak to, with

hang on, from, to

live at, in, on

argue with, against

contend with, against

depart from, for, at, on, in


Adverbial Phrase :







Grammar Index


Adverbial Phrase To HOME PAGE



Adverbial Phrase