down and out






down and out

beaten in the struggle of life

completely without resources or means of livelihood

The phrase
down and out comes from boxing and refers to a boxer who is knocked out by a blow. Since the early 20th century the noun down-and-out has been used to describe a person without money, a job or a place to live.


RELATED IDIOMS :


down and dirty

unprincipled

unpleasant

energetically earthy, direct or sexually explicit - North American informal




down in the mouth

(of a person or their expression) unhappy or dejected – informal




down on your luck

experiencing a period of bad luck – informal




down the road

in the future

later on – informal - chiefly North American

An Australian variant of this phrase is down the track.




down the tubes

lost or wasted – informal

2001 - High Country News - I've already lost my alfalfa crop…that's about $20,000 down the tubes.




down to the ground

completely

totally – informal

1997 - Daily Mail - Sly's better sense of comic timing suits the tongue-in-cheek script down to the ground.




down tools

stop work, typically as a form of industrial action - British informal




have someone down as = put someone down as = have something down as = put something down as

judge someone or something to be a particular type or class of person or thing

1914 - M. A. Von Arnim - The Pastor's Wife – The other excursionists were all in pairs. They thought Ingeborg was too and put her down at first as the German gentleman's wife because he did not speak to her.




have a down on = have be down on

disapprove of

feel hostile or antagonistic towards - informal




down and out :






down and out To HOME PAGE


Idioms Index – Previous Page