Compound Sentence





A
Compound-Sentence is made up of two or more Main Clauses joined together by coordinating conjunction and sometimes includes one or more Subordinate Clauses.

• The horse reared and the rider was thrown.

This sentence has two main clauses.

• They were font of music, played on various kinds of instruments and indulged in mush singing.

This sentence has three main clauses.

• They asked him, how he received the wound, but he refused to answer.

This sentence has two main clauses and one subordinate clause.

• He says what he means, and he means what he says.

This sentence has two main clauses and two subordinate clauses.

These sentences might have made it clear what a Compound-Sentence is.

The connection between two Main Clauses may be one of the following four kinds.

A Compound-Sentence is formed using one of the following four methods.

a. Copulative:

This way, the main clauses are simply coupled together.

Examples:

• God made the country and man made the town.
• Napoleon was not only a great soldier; he was also a wise ruler.
• He can not speak, nor can he write.
• He plays the Piano, he sings also.

All these sentences are coupled together.

This type of coupling the two main clauses is called Copulative method.

b. Adversative:

Here, the two main Clauses are opposite in meaning to each other.

Examples:

• He is slow but he is sure.
• I did my best nevertheless I failed.
• He is rich, yet he is not happy.
• He is vain, still his friends adore him.

Each of these sentences have two main clauses and they are opposite in meaning to each other.

c. Alternative or Disjunctive:

The way, the two main clauses are disjoined in meaning and a choice between them is offered for acceptance.

Examples:

• She must weep, or she will die.
• Either he is mad or he feigns madness.
• Walk quickly; else you will not overtake him.

Each of these sentences has two main clauses and they are disjoined in meaning and a choice is made between them.

d. Illative:

Examples:

IN this type, the second clause gets reference from the first clause.

• He is diligent, therefore he will succeed.
• He is unwell, so he can not attend his office.
• The angles are equal, therefore the sides are equal.

Here, each sentence has two main clauses. The second clause gets a reference from the first clause.

Note:

Few sentences need not have the conjunction to join the two main clauses;

Examples:

• Her court was pure. Her life was serene.
• Temperance promotes health. Intemperance destroys it.

These sentences have two main clauses. Both of them are joined without any conjunction.

This analysis of compound-sentence will help you form the sentences in your writings as well as in speaking.




Go to the section on 'Direct to Indirect Speech' to continue




Go to the 'Intermediary Index' Page




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