Transformations of Sentence





So far we have seen the nature of
Transformations of Sentence.

At the same time, a simple sentence can be changed into a complex sentence and vice-versa.

At the same time, a compound sentence can be changed into a complex sentence and vice-versa.

At the same time, a complex sentence can be changed into a compound sentence and vice-versa.

All such changes are possible to make the ideas of the sentences understandable.

This is in addition to the previous chapters on Transformations of Sentence.

1. To transform the simple sentence into a compound sentence:

A simple sentence can be transformed into a compound sentence by enlarging phrase or word into a co-ordinate clause.

Example-1:

• He must work hard to make up for the lost time.

This sentence can be made into two parts and those two parts can be joined by a conjunction ‘and’.

• He work hard and make up the lost time.

Example-2:

• To his eternal disgrace, he betrayed his country.
• He betrayed his country and this was to his eternal disgrace.

Example-3:

• Besides robbing the poor child, he also murdered the child.
• He not only robbed the poor child and also murdered the child.

Example-4:

• The teacher punished the children for disobedience.
• The children were disobedience so the teacher punished them

You can see How the Transformations of Sentence take place without changing the meaning of the sentence.

2. To transform a compound sentence into a simple sentence:

The following examples illustrate the chief ways in which the compound sentences are transformed into simple sentences.

Example-1:

• We must eat or we cannot live.
• We must eat to live.

Example-2:

• You must either pay the bill at once or return the goods.
• Failing prompt payment, the goods must be returned by you.

Example-3:

• He must not be late or he will be returned.
• In the event of his being late, he will be returned.

Example-4:

• He is rich, yet he is not contented.
• In spite being rich, he is not contented.

Example-5:

• This coat cannot be mine, for it is too big.
• For its big size, it cannot be mine.

Example-6:

• He is very poor, but he does not complain.
• In spite of being poor, he does not complain.

These examples are enough to make the point clear how the compound sentences are transformed into simple sentences.

You can see How the Transformations of Sentence take place without changing the meaning of the sentence.

3. To transform a simple sentence into a complex sentence:

A simple sentence can be transformed into a complex sentence by enlarging a phrase into a subordinate clause.

The clause may be Noun, Adjective or Adverb.

Example-1:

• He confessed his crime.

Here the noun (his crime) has been changed into a subordinated clause.

• He confessed that he was guilty of the crime.

Example-2:

• On the arrival of the mails, the steamer will leave.

Here the adverbial phrase has been changed into a subordinate clause.

• The steamer will leave as soon as the mails arrive.

Example-3:

• I saw a wounded bird.

Here the adjective phrase has been changed into a subordinate clause.

• I saw a bird that was wounded.

Example-4:

• On being punished, he wept.
• When he was punished, he wept.

You can see How the Transformations of Sentence take place without changing the meaning of the sentence.


4. To transform a Complex Sentence into a Simple Sentence:

The following sentences will make it clear how to transform the complex sentences into the simple sentence.

Example-1:

• He said that he was an innocent.

This Complex Sentence has been changed into a Simple Sentence as follows.

• He declared his innocence.

Example-2:

• How long I will stay is a doubtful?

Here, the Subordinate Clause has been changed into a Noun Clause.

• The duration of my stay is doubtful.

Example-3:

• Tell me where you live.

Here also, the Subordinate Clause has been changed into a Noun Clause.

• Tell me your address.

Example-4:

• He died in the village where he lived.

Here the Subordinate Clause has been changed into an Adjective Clause.

• He died in his native place.

Example-5:

• The moment that is lost is lost for ever.

Here also the Subordinate Clause has been changed into an Adjective Clause.

• The lost moment is lost forever.

Example-6:

• He was too tired that he can not stand.

Here the Subordinate Clause has been changed into an Adverb Clause.

• He was too tired to stand.

Example-7:

• He will not pay unless he is compelled.

Here also, the Subordinate Clause has been changed into an Adverb Clause.

• He will pay only under compulsion.

You can see How the Transformations of Sentence take place without changing the meaning of the sentence.



Go to the Intermediary Index Page



HOME PAGE



Popular Pages

More Info