Coordinate Conjunctions






Coordinate Conjunctions : Any or all of the coordinate clauses that make up a compound sentence may be complex. In that case, the sentence is called a compound complex sentence .


NOTE : Compound complex sentences form a special class or subdivision under the general head of compound sentences.


Old Uncle Venner was just coming out of his door, with a wood-horse and saw on his shoulder and, trudging along the street, he scrupled not to keep company with Phœbe so far as their paths lay together…..nor, in spite of his patched coat and rusty beaver, and the curious fashion of his tow-cloth trousers, could she find it in her heart to outwalk him. HAWTHORNE.


This sentence consists of three coordinate clauses, each independent of the others. These are joined by the
coordinate conjunctions and, nor. The first and the third clause are simple. But the second clause is complex. Hence the whole forms one compound complex sentence.


The complex clause consists of two clauses, the second of which is subordinate to the first. Taken as a whole, however, this complex clause is manifestly coordinate with the two simple clauses, since the three form a series joined by coordinate conjunctions.


Further
examples of compound complex sentences are….


1. The people drove out King Athamas, because he had killed his child and he roamed about in his misery, till he came to the Oracle in Delphi.—KINGSLEY


2. Society is the stage on which manners are shown; novels are their literature.—EMERSON


3. We keep no bees, but if I lived in a hive I should scarcely have more of their music.—COWPER


4. The same river ran on as it had run on before, but the cheerful faces that had once been reflected in its stream had passed away.—FROUDE


5. There are some laws and customs in this empire very peculiar; and if they were not so directly contrary to those of my own dear country, I should be tempted to say a little in their justification.—SWIFT


6. Here they arrived about noon, and Joseph proposed to Adams that they should rest awhile in this delightful place.—FIELDING


7. I never saw a busier person than she seemed to be; yet it was difficult to say what she did.—C. BRONTË


8. Malaga possessed a brave and numerous garrison, and the common people were active, hardy, and resolute; but the city was rich and commercial, and under the habitual control of opulent merchants, who dreaded the ruinous consequences of a siege.—IRVING


9. The Spaniards were not to be taken by surprise; and, before the barbarian horde had come within their lines, they opened such a deadly fire from their heavy guns, supported by the musketry and crossbows, that the assailants were compelled to fall back slowly, but fearfully mangled, to their former position.—PRESCOTT


10. Her cheeks were as pale as marble, but of a cold, unhealthy, ashen white; and my heart ached to think that they had been bleached, most probably, by bitter and continual tears.—HOOD


11. The hawk, having in spiral motion achieved the upper flight, fell like a thunderbolt on the raven, stunned him with the blow, clutched him in his talons, folded him in his wings, and, the hawk undermost, they tumbled down like a black ball, till within a short distance from the earth.—TRELAWNY


In this sentence
they were is understood after till.







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