Kinds of Degrees of Comparison




Kinds of Degrees of Comparison :


Positive, Comparative, Superlative Degrees


Using Adjectives Correctly in Relationships


Start with an adjective….large


This sentence shows the use of large in the positive degree.


The hippopotamus is large.


But what happens when you want to compare the large hippopotamus to something else?


When you compare the large hippopotamus to another thing, you have to use the comparative degree. This means that the word has to change.


There are 2 ways that you can change large to the comparative degree.


Add “er" to the end of the word.


Add “more" to the front of the word.


large + er = larger


The hippopotamus is larger than the pig.


Some adjectives, especially those with 3 syllables or more, use “more" instead of “er."


Here’s an example.


The hippopotamus is more intelligent than the chicken.


But what should we do if we want to compare our large hippopotamus with more than just one other thing? What should we do if we want to compare our large hippopotamus to….let’s say….3 other things?


We would then use the adjective in the superlative degree and that means that our word would have to change again.


There are 2 ways that you can change “large" to the superlative degree.


Add “est" to the end of the word.


Add “most" to the front of the word.


large + est = largest


The hippopotamus is the largest one in the bunch.


Here’s an example where you would use “most" in front of an adjective.


The hippopotamus is the most courteous animal of the group.


Move it or lose it!


You’re outta here!


Hit the highway, big guy!


May I please be excused?


So, we have learned that we can use an adjective to show relationships in the comparative and superlative degrees.


larger (comparing 2 things)


largest (comparing more than 2 things)


more intelligent (comparing 2 things)


most intelligent (comparing more than 2 things)


more courteous (comparing 2 things)


most courteous (comparing more than 2 things)


Like many things in the English language, there are some exceptions.


Some words change differently in the comparative and superlative degrees.


For example, let’s consider the word “good".


POSITIVE: good


COMPARATIVE: better


SUPERLATIVE: best


This grade is good.


This grade is better than that grade.


The grade is the best grade of all.


Here’s another example of unusual changes from positive, comparative and superlative degrees.


POSITIVE: bad


COMPARATIVE: worse


SUPERLATIVE: worst


Keep an eye out for them!


Kinds of Degrees of Comparison


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