Degrees of Comparison



Degrees of Comparison are used when we compare one person or one thing with another.

There are three
Degrees of Comparison in English.

They are:

1. Positive degree.

2. Comparative degree.

3. Superlative degree.

Let us see all of them one by one.

1.Positive degree.

When we speak about only one person or thing, We use the Positive degree.

Examples:

• This house is big.

In this sentence only one noun “The house” is talked about.

• He is a tall student.

• This flower is beautiful.

• He is an intelligent boy.

Each sentence mentioned above talks about only one noun.

The second one in the Degrees of Comparison is...

2.Comparative degree.

When we compare two persons or two things with each other,

We use both the Positive degree and Comparative degree.

Examples:

a. This house is bigger than that one. (Comparative degree)

This house is not as big as that one. (Positive degree)

The term “bigger” is comparative version of the term “big”.

Both these sentences convey the same meaning.

b. This flower is more beautiful than that. (Comparative)

This flower is not as beautiful as that. (Positive)

The term “more beautiful” is comparative version of the term “beautiful”.

Both these sentences convey the same meaning.

c. He is more intelligent than this boy. (Comparative)

He is not as intelligent as this boy. (Positive)

The term “more intelligent” is comparative version of the term “intelligent”.

Both these sentences convey the same meaning.

d. He is taller than Mr. Hulas. (Comparative)

He is not as tall as Mr. Hulas. (Positive)

The term “taller” is comparative version of the term “tall”.

Both these sentences convey the same meaning.



When we compare more than two persons or things with one another,

We use all the three Positive, Comparative and Superlative degrees.

Examples:

a. This is the biggest house in this street. (Superlative)

This house is bigger than any other house in this street. (Comparative)

No other house in this street is as big as this one. (Positive)

The term “biggest” is the superlative version of the term “big”.

All the three sentences mean the same meaning.

b. This flower is the most beautiful one in this garden. (Superlative)

This flower is more beautiful than any other flower in this garden. (Comparative)

No other flower in this garden is as beautiful as this one. (Comparative)

The term “most beautiful” is the superlative version of the term “beautiful”.

All the three sentences mean the same meaning.

c. He is the most intelligent in this class. (Superlative)

He is more intelligent than other boys in the class. (Comparative)

No other boy is as intelligent as this boy. (Positive)

The term “most intelligent” is superlative version of the term “intelligent”.

Both these sentences convey the same meaning.

d. He is the tallest student in this class. (Superlative)

He is taller than other students in this class. (Comparative)

No other student is as tall as this student. (Positive)

The term “tallest” is superlative version of the term “tall”.



*Degrees of Comparison are applicable only to Adjectives and Adverbs*

*Nouns and verbs do not have degrees of comparisons*

He is the tallest student in the class.

The term “tallest” is an adjective.

Among the members of the group, Mr. Clinton speaks most effectively.

The term “effectively” is an adverb.

All the terms used in the above-examples are either adjectives or adverbs.

We have seen all the three Degrees of Comparison.

Let us see their models.

Model -1: “The best”:

Examples:

i. This is the best hotel in this area.

No other hotel is as better as this on in this area.

No other hotel is as good as this one in this area.

ii. Unemployment is the most serious problem facing our country.

Unemployment is more serious than any other problem facing our country.

No other problem facing our country is as serious as unemployment.

Model-2: “One of the best”:

Examples:

i. Calcutta is one of the largest cities in India.

Calcutta is large than most other cities in India.

Very few cities in India are as large as Calcutta.

ii. Satin Tendulkar is one of the best batsmen in the world.

Satin Tendulkar is better than most other batsmen in the world.

No other batman in the world is as good as Satin Tendulkar.

Model-3: “Not the best”:

Examples:

i. This is not the best solution to the problem.

ii. This is not better than few other solutions to this problem.

iii. Other solutions to this problem are not as good as this one.

ii. New York is not the largest city in America.

New York is not bigger than many other cities in America.

Few other cities in America are at least as large as New York.

Few adjectives and adverbs get their Comparative forms by simply getting “more” before them.

And their superlative terms, by getting “most” before them.

Examples:

Beautiful..........more beautiful..........most beautiful

Effective……….more effective………most effective

Effectively………more effectively……….most effectively

Enjoyable………….more enjoyable……….most enjoyable

Useful……………….more useful………..most useful

Different………..more different…………most different

Honest………..more honest…………..most honest

Qualified…………more qualified…………most qualified

Few adjectives and adverbs get their Comparative forms by simply getting “er” after them and their superlative terms, by getting “est” after them.

Examples:

Hard……………..harder……………..hardest

Big……………….bigger…………….biggest

Tall……………..taller……………tallest

Long………………longer………………longest

Short……………..shorter……………….shortest

Costly…………………costlier……………costliest

Simple………………….simpler………….simplest

Degrees of Comparison add beauty and varieties to the sentences.



InterjectionGrammarHOME PAGE

Share
Additional Info

Follow These Links!