End a Sentence with a Preposition

English Glossary Index

End a Sentence with a Preposition :

You may have learned that ending a sentence with a preposition is a serious breach of grammatical etiquette. It doesn't take a grammarian to spot a sentence-ending preposition, so this is an easy rule to get caught up on (!).

Although it is often easy to remedy the offending preposition, sometimes it isn't, and repair efforts sometimes result in a clumsy sentence.

"Indicate the book you are quoting from" is not greatly improved with "Indicate from which book you are quoting."

Based on shaky historical precedent, the rule itself is a latecomer to the rules of writing. Those who dislike the rule are fond of recalling Churchill's rejoinder:

  • That is nonsense up with which I shall not put.

  • We should also remember the child's complaint:

  • What did you bring that book that I don't like to be read to out of up for?

  • Related Links :

  • Common Prepositions

  • End a Sentence with a Preposition

  • Prepositions of Time

  • Prepositions of Place

  • Prepositions of Location

  • Prepositions of Movement

  • Prepositions with Nouns

  • Prepositions with Adjectives

  • Prepositions with Verbs

  • Idiomatic Expressions with Prepositions

  • Unnecessary Prepositions

  • Prepositions in Parallel Form

  • English Glossary Index

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